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flintsword

I am a business professional and an amateur poker player that takes his game seriously. Over the years I have worked successfully at my game winning qualifications to three World Poker Tour Events: WPT Paris 2005 (took seat entry $16,000), WPT Cyprus 2009 ($0 out of the money at 50%), WPT Paris 2011 (cashing 25th for $24,000), & WPT Prague 2011 ($0 out of the money at 50%). As a rule I generally qualify into tournaments. PL Omaha Hi a favourite.

Name:Yves Farges
Website:www.myspace.com/flintsword
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flintsword
"The lucky player is usually the player that knows how much to leave to chance."

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Shared liquidity would make more tax revenue for the members and is a logical next step so of course the French regulators are against it. The inability of the ARJEL employees to master basic mathematics or work in order to maximize tax revenue for their employers is just poor management in the laisser-faire socialist state that France is trapped - once again - for the next few years.

Watch for an exodus of Russian online poker players.

Great reporting. Please add a section called "taking a shot about an unknown that actually wins against these nosebleed stakes players. A little press for the little guys.

Kudos to the Borgata Casino for having the guts to call this one. Every player in the tournament should cooperate 100% with the casino if only to narrow the list of suspects to isolate the weasels that introduced counterfeit chips into the tournament. The faster the field of suspects is narrowed, the faster a payout closure can be made. If the casino is smart they will refund a ortion of the entry fees but that call remains in their hands.

I am certain that some of the remaining 27 players will be howling but calming down wake up and smell the coffee: The tournament has been the victim of massive cheating so it is done. Help them catch the cheaters and wait for some sort of payout is the best line.

As for the cheaters, you are already toast because the eye in the sky *will* have caught you introducing chips into play so get ready to get caught.

Congrats ... quite an achievement & he sounds pretty level-headed. The Spanish attempt to regulate it's online population is a failure & the proof is the best online Spanish poker players are going to Britain.

There has been real success in Britain to make playing poker a social activity, with a flurry of local events at lower buy-ins. Nice to see.

The UK really get it, with progress all the time.

It is shocking to see the abject stupidity of ARJEL when there is a very simple fix: revenue sharing by merging pools of players from Italy and other countries. They have not even had the intellect to propose out-of-France player tables paying a slightly higher rake. The French bureaucracy is famous for acting quickly to take advantage of revenue opportunities but Ice-age slow of modernize to increase revenues. Think how much money France would make if they hired PokerStars to advise them ... it is in the "add a zero or two to revenues" category. Hopefully the next French President will transfer them to some backwater bureaucracy where they can do little damage.

"On the very last hand of the tournament both Merson and Schindler agreed to go all in blind" ... Great job treating the sport of poker with respect. You get heads up for millions in prizes and instead of fighting it out, the players switch to bingo ... all in blind.

Spectators can legitimately think "WTH"

PokerNews Readers also "WTH"

and the prestigious event that is the PCA is deprived of a legitimate fight to the finish.

Grandmaster draws by two young men who could not be bothered to consider that the game of poker is evolving into a real sport and requires you at the very least play out the hands, even if tired.

Lastly, it smacks of collusion. There was probably none ... but it looks fishy as hell. At the very least it is a downer and an anti-climax. At the worse the organizers will look at the circumstances around the players at the time.

There are poor amateurs, middle-class amateurs, & wealthy amateurs. Working to make poker a fun & entertaining sport allows all classes to enjoy the competition while competing against the pros. I sincerely hope that every pro appreciates the money that Newey is dropping into poker while improving. It takes guts (& a ton of cash ...) to do it this way but makes for a good story.

Many thanks for your video blogs that not only bring real poker subjects into the sharp light of reality but also the idea that there is life alongside of poker. It is very enjoyable to see, especially for serious amateur poker players that have a life outside of poker. BTW ... Congrats on a super year.

Online poker needs a playing population so online sites have to make agreements with other online poker playing populations to achieve critical mass.

Name that program Smile

It is encouraging to see online poker sites such as HighStakesDB take a responsible position by respecting player requests. They track but do not publish so anyone "opting out" is in a "heads I win, tails I don't lose" situation because if they get fantastic results, at a later date they can just ask the site to light up their stats and they have all the benefits of a documented big winner AND the anonymous profile while getting there.

It is such a rarified poker atmosphere at the top that there are few people that are unknown. Being known is not the problem to most poker players ... it is managing what little fame they have before they hit the big time. Poker fame is also a full time job ... one need only look at the hard-working staff on the Team supporting Daniel Negreanu to understand that.

Before "opting out" it would be smarter to invest in some: (1) Tax advice from a serious firm like KPMG, (2) Organize some insurance that also salts away some income in the long term, (3) Work towards a basic list of personal goals such as family, house, education fund.

Keep in mind that one good sponsorship deal for a watch or product can be quite lucrative so it does pay to appreciate what little fame you gather up with your poker skills.

Let us all remember what Napoleon said: "Fame is fleeting ... but obscurity is forever."

So the New Jersey Gaming Commission is excluding the largest pool of potential online poker players in the world in a new round of "shoot myself in the foot". New Jersey will have to deal with all the political fallout from amateur online sites that are willing to pay enough to "be considered" by the New Jersey gaming commission.

Read them the story about killing the goose that lays the golden eggs as a hint.

Totally deserved, such a hard worker ... it was meant to be!

Let us also keep in mind that Ryan Riess is paying in 2013 in advance for all those poker tournaments, which increases his poker expenses in 2013 and reduces his taxable 2013 poker income, so he is in fact making additional cash back on taxes. Although it would be nice to get this confirmed by a U.S. tax expert, it does make sense. I remember reading that from the point of U.S. taxes, after a big score paying for a lot of tournaments was good tax strategy since gains and losses cannot be carried forward like in Canada.

The 2-$100Ks, 2-$25Ks, 1-$15K, and 3-$10Ks equals $295,000.

If he sells 100% of himself at $3,250 per 1% that equals $325,000 for a profit of $30,000 so I assume he is keeping some percentage for himself or else, what`s the point.

So if he decided to sell 50% of himself, his tour cost would be roughly $150,000.

This may be pretty smart because last year`s min cash in the PCA (for example) was $228,960 so to break even he would have to cash at least twice.

If he sold 100% he would pocket $30,000, so the sweet spot seems to be about 90% staked and 10% kept for himself. His cost would be $30,000 and 10% of a min cash of say $200K is still a nice $20K.

There is also the not-unreasonable situation that he sold only 25% of his action for publicity value and has a business manager working on a deal for the balance of entry fees to be paid by an online site and he is playing for 75% of his action. This sounds more likely.

Outstanding result! The neat thing about Ryan Riess winning the Main Event is that when he buys a Rolls Royce with his winnings ... his initials will be on the Grill Smile

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