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Denmark's Theis Vad Hennebjerre Wins Unibet Open Copenhagen Main Event

Theis Vad Hennebjerre

Local player Theis Vad Hennebjerre won the 2015 Unibet Open Copenhagen Main Event for DKK 620,000 (€83,115) after a long day on the felt. He got lucky at the right time, made the right decisions in most cases, and picked off his opponent facing the biggest bluff of the tournament.

Final Table Results

1Theis Vad HennebjerreDenmarkDKK 620,000 (€83,115)
2Henrik JunckerDenmarkDKK 425,000 (€56,974)
3Nikolaj SeydelDenmarkDKK 275,000 (€36,866)
4Robin NielsenSwedenDKK 210,000 (€28,152)
5Henrik HecklenDenmarkDKK 150,000 (€20,109)
6Pavlos XanthopoulosGreeceDKK 120,000 (€16,087)
7Bogdan PetrescuRomaniaDKK 100,000 (€13,406)
8Gordan FlorinRomaniaDKK 80,000 (€10,725)
9Tapio JárvinenFinlandDKK 61,800 (€8,285)

The third and final day of play started with 25 players and the goal of playing down to a winner. Play started at 1 p.m. local time, and before everyone knew it the tournament was down to its final two tables. A double bust out and the tournament was rid of the last Dutch and last Belgian players, and well-known Danish player Rasmus Agerskov also fell before the big paydays were handed out.

From 18 down to nine didn't take long either, though some players handed out bad beats to get there. The biggest pot of the tournament at the time was a post-flop clash between the aces of Nikolaj Seydel and queens of Mohanathas Sivagnanam. That made Seydel the chip leader and gave him all the wiggle room to make a really deep run.

The final table of nine was reached not long after. In fact, the final table started with only eight players after two players busted at the same time on the final table bubble.

Tapio Járvinen was the first to go when he shoved all in under the gun with the {A-Hearts}{4-Spades} and ran into Pavlos Xanthopoulos's {A-Diamonds}{7-Diamonds} in the big blind. Gordan Florin followed some time later. He ran queen-nine into aces and wouldn't catch up, despite picking up quite some few outs along the way.

A cooler ended Bogdan Petrescu's tournament life. He had a reasonable stack but wasn't sitting deep enough to get away from ace-king. Vad Hennebjerre had aces and the two of them ended up with all the money in before the flop. Petrescu found not even a glimmer, and he hit the rail in seventh place.

Xanthopoulos would be right behind him in line at the payout desk. The Greek had ace-six and, wouldn't you know it, Vad Hennebjerre had aces again.

The most experienced player at the final table was the one to go next. Henrik Hecklen couldn't really get things going at the final table and eventually finished in fifth place. He first lost with aces against Seydel's nines when a nine hit the river. Eventually, his jack-ten couldn't improve against Seydel's ace-seven who finished the job with a board full of blanks.

The four-handed situation lasted for some time. Robin Nielsen was the unfortunate one to eventually depart next, and then Seydel finished third. His last hand was a remarkable one, and would be one we won't quickly forget. In a three-bet pot and a checked flop, Seydel called the turn and bluff-shoved the river with fives on a board full of cards that didn't do anything to improve his hand. Vad Hennebjerre had all the trouble in the world calling with aces, but he stood strong to the test.

The heads-up match didn't last long. Vad Hennebjerre started with a 3-1 advantage, and he and Henrik Juncker got the money in soon enough. Vad Hennebjerre pushed with the queen-ten, Juncker called with the king-six, and by the time the turn was out Juncker was drawing dead as a jack gave Vad Hennebjerre a straight. The river even improved Vad Hennebjerre's hand to a flush and the third Unibet Open Copenhagen had it's winner.

Congratulations to Theis Vad Hennebjerre, who took home the trophy, the big paycheck, and a memory that will live forever.

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