Playing a Flush Draw Slowly in a Multi-Way Pot

Playing a Flush Draw Slowly in a Multi-Way Pot
Sharelines
  • In a multi-way pot, @JonathanLittle tells why he chose to play a flush draw slowly rather than bet.

  • .@JonathanLittle on a shootout hand in which he had to decide whether to play a flush draw fast or slow.

Today I want to share another hand from the second table of a $1,500 no-limit hold'em shootout I played at the World Series of Poker. Again, with a shootout event, you have to win the table to advance, so it's like a "winner-take-all" situation.

There were still eight players at the table when this hand took place in the 400/800/100 level. Picking up {9-Spades}{8-Spades} in early position, I raised to 2,200 from my 80-big blind stack.

As I discuss in the video below, I like adding some lower suited connectors like this to my raising range. Doing so can make you a little more difficult to play against than is the case if you're only raising with big cards and premium starters.

A tight-aggressive player in the hijack called as did a splashy player in the big blind, with both having similar-sized stacks to mine. The flop came {k-Spades}{9-Clubs}{2-Spades}, and the big blind checked.

Here a lot of players will just blindly bet — after all, we have a pair and a flush draw. But here, and especially multi-way, I like checking sometimes since if the pot does get very big we're probably not going to be too happy.

What would you do in this spot — bet or check? Take a look at how I played it, and listen to my reasoning as the hand continues onward:

After it checked around on the flop, I made my flush on the turn. Here (as I explain) I have one of my best made hands and I bet it. Know when to play slow and when to play fast.

Alas, the runout was a rough one for me as a fourth spade came on the river, presenting another decision for me. How would you play this river?

Jonathan Little is a professional poker player and author with over $6,800,000 in live tournament earnings. He writes a weekly educational blog and hosts a podcast at JonathanLittlePoker.com. Sign up to learn poker from Jonathan for free at PokerCoaching.com. You can follow him on Twitter @JonathanLittle.

Everybody needs an account at one of these online poker rooms! They're the biggest, the best, and we get you the best poker bonuses. Check out our online poker section for details on all the online poker rooms around.

What do you think?

More Stories

Casino News

Other Stories