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2009 WSOP: Traply Takes Down Bracelet in Shootout #41

Peter Traply

Only five players out of the original 300 runners made it to the final table of Event #41, $5,000 No-Limit Hold’em Shootout. And it only took about five hours of play for young Hungarian Peter Traply to take down the WSOP gold bracelet and the $348,728 top prize after besting Andrew Lichtenberger heads up.

The final five made it to Day 3 by surviving a series of no-limit hold’em shootouts, where the players started off by winning a ten-handed single-table tournament. The 30 Day 1 winners then returned to the Rio for Day 2 to play one of five six-handed single-table tournaments. Those five winners made the final table, where everyone began with equal chip stacks.

Nasr El Nasr started off like a house on fire, raising and reraising with abandon. El Nasr put himself in position to dominate the final table with his aggression, but then he got unlucky in a key hand with Andrew Lichtenberger and ended up being the first player bounced from the final table. El Nasr three-bet Lichtenberger preflop with {A-Hearts}{A-Diamonds}, and then snap-called when Lichtenberger shoved with {10-Diamonds}{9-Hearts}. The flop helped Lichtenberger a little, pairing his nine and giving him outs to a straight on the {6-Diamonds}{7-Diamonds}{9-Hearts} board. The dagger came on the turn, when the {10-Clubs} gave Lichtenberger two pair to crack El Nasr’s aces. The river was a less-than-helpful {J-Clubs}, and El Nasr was crippled. He got the last of his chips in a few hands later with pocket threes, but Peter Traply called with pocket eights, which held up to send El Nasr packing in fifth place ($82,697).

Danny Wong was next to fall when he ran afoul of Andrew Lichtenberger to finish in fourth place ($105,609). Wong raised preflop with {A-Diamonds}{10-Clubs}, and Lichtenberger made the call. The flop of {10-Diamonds}{2-Spades}{2-Clubs} looked good to Wong, and he led out. Lichtenberger called once again to see the {7-Clubs} come on the turn. He then checked to Wong, who moved all in. Lichtenberger called with {A-Clubs}{A-Spades} for a better two pair, and Wong needed a ten on the river to stay alive. The river was the {2-Hearts} instead, and then there were three.

Three-handed play continued for quite awhile before the big stacks of Lichtenberger and Traply finally wore down Maxim Lykov. In his final hand, Lykov moved all in preflop with {A-Hearts}{10-Spades}, and Lichtenberger looked him up with {J-Diamonds}{J-Clubs}. The board ran out an altogether unremarkable {3-Clubs}{6-Clubs}{6-Diamonds}{2-Hearts}{9-Hearts}, and Lykov was done in third place ($145,063).

It looked like the heads-up duel would only last a few hands after Andrew Lichtenberger lost most of his chips in a huge pot just after Lykov busted. All the chips went in preflop, with Lichtenberger's {A-Diamonds}{Q-Diamonds} in a classic race against Traply's {6-Hearts}{6-Clubs}. Lichtenberger vaulted into the lead on the {A-Hearts}{9-Clubs}{8-Hearts} flop, but the {6-Spades} on the turn put Traply back in front and left Lictenberger drawing dead. The river was an inconsequential {2-Clubs}, and for a moment it looked like the tournament might be over, but a countdown of the stacks revealed that Lichtenberger still had 250,000 left.

Nearly crippled, Lichtenberger struggled back into contention and he made a nearly two-hour heads-up match out of it. But finally he couldn’t stand up to the chip stack of Peter Traply any longer, and all the chips went in one last time. A preflop raising war led to Lichtenberger shoving the last of his chips with {A-Diamonds}{J-Hearts}. Traply called with a dominating {A-Spades}{K-Diamonds}, and when the board came down {5-Hearts}{3-Clubs}{A-Clubs}{Q-Spades}{Q-Hearts}, Traply’s king kicker played. After a valiant comeback, Lichtenberger finally made his exit in second place ($215,403).

Andrew Lichtenberger put on a great heads-up match, but in the end Peter Traply would not be denied and he took home $348,728 and his first ever WSOP gold bracelet.

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