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Former 'Loose Cannon' Nadya Magnus Wins WSOPC High Roller

Nadya Magnus
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  • Nadya Magnus was made famous in the poker world for her appearance on the PokerStars Big Game.

Nadya Magnus won the $2,200 High Roller event at World Series of Poker Circuit Potawatomi in Milwaukee for $71,398 and her second WSOP Circuit ring. It's the biggest career cash for Magnus, who beat out a field of 119 in the single reentry event. The score comes on the heels of her ninth-place finish at PokerStars Championship Bahamas for $56,260.

Magnus was made famous in the poker world for her appearance on the PokerStars Big Game. That show featured five well-known or professional players and one amateur, dubbed the "loose cannon." Magnus was one of a few loose cannons to win big on the show, banking $63,600.

Official Final Table Results

PlacePlayerHometownPrize
1Nadya MagnusPalatine, IL$71,398
2Eric RivkinEast Hampton, NY$44,130
3Niel MittelmanLibertyville, IL$31,421
4Matt ShepskySkokie, IL$22,824
5Craig TrostMadison, WI$16,908
6Kenny NguyenLansing, IL$12,764
7Steve LausonManitowoc, WI$9,818
8Jim JuvancicWestchester, IL$7,690

The tournament paid out only 12 places. Ryan Van Sanford and Johanssy Joseph were a couple of notable eliminations in the money who did not make the final table.

According to the live updates, Eric Rivkin took a big lead into the final table after he picked up aces and won a three-way all in on the unofficial final table bubble. One player went bust after missing a flush draw with {k-Clubs}{3-Clubs} all in preflop, while Dennis Elliott was unable to get away from jacks on a ten-high flop. He busted his remaining crumbs in ninth after the final table began.

Magnus was one of a trio of short stacks to start the final table. Fellow shorties Jim Juvancic and Steve Lauson found themselves out the door shortly after play began.

Rivkin, who had busted two-time ring winner Juvancic, enabled Magnus to continue laddering when he busted colorful character Kenny Nguyen. Nguyen decided to take a stand with ace-ten, but the short-stacked player found himself outflopped by Rivkin's {k-Clubs}{7-Clubs} when a seven appeared and neither player improved. That pot gave Rivkin about half of the total chips five-handed.

Magnus then picked up the {a-Hearts}{k-Hearts} and shoved over a raise from Craig Trost, who was on a heater at Potawatomi after winning a recent Mid-States Poker Tour event and final tabling the big reentry to open the WSOPC stop. Trost needed help with {a-Clubs}{5-Clubs} and found some when a five flopped, but a king followed it to send him packing.

Matt Shepsky got unlucky to bust in fourth when he shoved in 10 big blinds on the button with {k-Clubs}{8-Clubs} and Rivkin looked him up with {k-Diamonds}{6-Diamonds}. A six on the turn doomed Shepsky.

Rivkin scored yet another knockout when his ace-jack outran a pair of fives held by Niel Mittelman and Rivkin went heads up with Magnus holding more than two-thirds of the chips.

Magnus turned the tables on Rivkin when she turned a straight with five-four after flopping open-ended as the board ran out {10-Spades}{6-Spades}{3-Clubs}{7-Diamonds}{2-Clubs}. Rivkin tank-called her river jam and showed a six, leaving Magnus in complete command with a 6-1 lead.

Rivkin managed a double with king-queen against {a-Spades}{5-Spades}, hitting a straight on the river. Rivkin got it in with live Broadway cards again with {q-Spades}{j-Hearts} against Magnus' {a-Clubs}{3-Diamonds}. A board of {10-Spades}{7-Clubs}{4-Diamonds}{k-Clubs} gave him myriad outs to the river, but the {6-Clubs} wasn't one of them, enabling Magnus to take down the event.

Photo courtesy of WSOP

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