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The Poker Hand I’ll Never Forget: Matt Glantz

The Hand I’ll Never Forget: Matt Glantz and the One That Got Away 0001
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  • Matt Glantz was dealt a crushing beat deep in the 2013 $111,111 High Roller for One Drop.

It’s the hand that put you over the top. Or the two cards you held that time you were rivered for a monster pot. Everyone has “the hand,” that one that you remember no matter how many more tournaments or cash games played. PokerNews takes a look at those hands that stick with players and relive the glory, or misery, depending on the results.

For our third edition of this series, we spoke with Matt Glantz about a huge pot he lost in the 2013 High Roller for One Drop at the World Series of Poker.

Also Read: Mike Matusow remembers his disaster at the 2005 WSOP Main Event final table

2013 $111,111 One Drop High Roller

This hand sticks with Glantz four years later. It was a critical hand late in this massive payout tournament, and if not for a bit of bad luck the tournament would have played out differently for him.

"There were 14 players left and we were already in the money," says Glantz, who has $6.4 million in tournament winnings. "Martin Jacobson and I were chip leaders at my table."

With the blinds at 80,000/160,000, Jacobson opened for 320,000 from the cutoff and Lawrence Greenberg called from the button. Brandon Steven called from the small blind, and then Glantz shoved all in from the big blind for around 33 big blinds with the {a-Clubs}{k-Hearts}. Jacobson called for 2.835 million, the other two players folded.

"Martin thought about it and called with {A-Diamonds}{Q-Diamonds}," Glantz says. "The winner was about to have all the chips."

The flop brought {9-Diamonds}{Q-Hearts}{K-Diamonds}, keeping Glantz in front with a pair of kings but giving Jacobson a pair and a flush draw. The {2-Spades} on the turn changed nothing, but the crushing {10-Diamonds} arrived on the river to give Jacobson a winning flush. Glantz was left running on fumes, and a few hands later he got his last chips all-in with his K-10 versus Jeremy Ausmus’ A-10 and was eliminated in 13th place for $251,549. It was not a bad payday, but he knows it could have been so much more if that board had gone differently.

Jacobson went on to finish sixth for $807,427 and would win his Main Event title a year later for $10 million. Maryland’s Tony Gregg went on to win the title for $4.8 million.

Glantz still wishes big slick had been just a little kinder to him.

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